Transformative Action Network

What is the Transformative Action Network (TAN)? 

Transformative Action Network members are committed to co-conspirator abolitionist action, in line with restorative justice principles.  

By learning to relate effectively with racism and interrupt patterns of white supremacist culture, TAN members become allies and co-conspirators to Black and Brown community members. Using restorative justice work, TAN is helping Timebank build resilience instead of fragility, action instead of silence and solidarity instead of hierarchy. Abolitionist restorative practices become powerful tools that enhance mutuality and respect across gender, race and class lines. They lead to the kind of collaboration that can move Madison beyond anemic liberalism to real progressive alternatives. Anti-racist restorative practice among Timebankers is leading to racial justice.  

As James Baldwin wrote, “Any citizen of this country who figures himself as responsible – and particularly those of you who deal with the minds and hearts of young people – must be prepared to “go for broke.” As a network, we are striving to give racial justice everything we have. 

VISION

Getting involved with TAN means first taking an orientation that explores diaspora identity and racial disparities. The diaspora activity gives participants an opportunity to examine elements of entitlement and dispossession connected to identity, history, and perceptions of belonging. At the core of this introduction to diaspora identity is the question: ‘how does one’s personal investment in narratives of domination perpetuate white supremacist culture?’ In any given moment, we have a choice about which narrative we’re going to subscribe to. That choice is enacted in our every day actions. By examining our own cultural identities, we create the possibility of dismantling hierarchies grounded in privilege, racism, and ignorance.

Approaching racial disparities from the perspective that we all inherited the social conditions and inequities that we’re experiencing provides further opportunity to change the way we act. We can transform the cultural practices that we have inherited. Transformative Action Network takes this as its first priority. Within this context, ‘action’ is not grounded in guilt or shame or blame. Rather, it emerges from a self-awareness and conviction about personal power to make change. We engage in this work through Community Lab for Intentional Practice (CLIP) and other opportunities to build collaborations and to seek out co-conspirator alliances that end racial disparities.

Our CLIP labs are loosely guided by the work of Dr. Bettina Love and her book ‘We Want to Do More Than Survive: Abolitionist Teaching and the Pursuit of Educational Freedom’. The abolitionist approach is valuable because it is committed to the idea of replacing institutional harm. The educational survival complex is something that is replicated in all of our institutions. We use that premise in building collaborations with other organizations and groups that seek to do similar abolitionist and anti-racist work in other institutions.

How to Get Involved

Projects

Open House

  • Posted on: 1 January 2020
  • By: Dane County TimeBank

The Restorative Justice Open House at the Timebank is a gathering intended to offer the general public music and other entertainment and refreshments to provide a easy going, activity based and fun environment in which to  exchange ideas and learn from each other about restorative justice and current projects.

The Open Houses are currentlly on hold due to COVID-19. The next date for an Open House will be announced in the future. 

Excellent Co-Conspirator Checklist

  • Posted on: 1 January 2020
  • By: Dane County TimeBank

 

Consistently Working to Be:

  • Anti-Racist & Action-Oriented
  • Preferential to Co-Conspiracy over Allyship
  • Liberation-Focused & Reflective
  • Actively Developing Self-Awareness
  • Deeply Curious
  • Creative & Collaborative
  • Empathetic & Humble

To Act: 

  • Honor All Forms of Life
  • Transform Silence Into Action
  • Understand Impact Matters Over Intent
  • Trust & Accept Others' Lived Experiences 
  • Commit to Safety, Healing, and Agency for All
  • Open to Receiving Feedback & Being Challenged
  • Maintain a Sense of Accountability and Blamelessness
  • Invest in Black and Brown Youth and Community Self-Determination
  • Practice Restorative Justice to Achieve Transformative Justice
  • Interrupt Organizational Practices that Maintain Oppression
  • Address Violence at its Roots, at both Individual and Collective Levels
  • Dismantle White Supremacy and Reassemble Black Liberation Consciousness and Autonomy 

 

Co-Conspiracy is integral to our work with restorative justice. This is the definition we operate by. 

Restorative Justice is a theory and practice of community-based approach to doing community building, responding when harm is caused or healing damaged relationships. This work is based on 360-degree accountability, mutual concern, dignity and respect.  

Grounded in the view that all members of a community are worthy and interdependent, the practice promotes community building, self-awareness, and empathy to create justice, equity and freedom. Through the creation of collective agreements people work to resolve conflict and respond to deep patterns of harm which are often grounded in historical, structural and physical racism and violence. 

Abolitionist / Co-Conspirator Restorative Justice Training

  • Posted on: 1 January 2020
  • By: Dane County TimeBank

The Timebank Tranformative Action Network hosts Abolitionist Restorative Justice workshops that meet people where they are on the journey of creating collaborative, sustainable change. 

  • Learn how to engage in liberated narratives
  • Learn how to identify and reject scripted complicity in white supremacist culture
  • Learn how to trust your heart and those of others in our ability to manifest justice on the spot
  • Build solidarity within and across communities of color

This intensive will challenge you, support your existing liberation practice, and help connect you with other like minded folx.

To register for an upcoming workshop, please email tan.timebank@gmail.com

Donations accepted and go to the Timebank's Black Leaders Scholarship Fund. Participants can earn Timebank hours for investing their time in this work.

Community Lab for Intentional Practice (CLIP)

  • Posted on: 1 January 2020
  • By: Dane County TimeBank

The Lab is focused on providing an alternative community space for developing abolitionist, co-conspirator and restorative justice practices that eliminate racial disparities in Dane County and empower the voices of those most impacted. CLIP prioritizes expanding self-awareness and the ability to offer transformative practice at interpersonal and institutional levels of engagement. Recognizing that unlearning the ways we participate in white supremacist culture are deeply ingrained, members are committed to consistent and long term work.

CLIP offers ongoing restorative circle opportunities, anti-racism, institutional harm, and practice that builds capacity to relate to real life and hypothetical scenarios. Our work in the lab also includes opportunities to engage in creative, contemplative and collaborative projects that dismantle institutional injustice and develops alternative infrastructure.

Organizations are welcome to request lab sessions that respond to their specific needs.

Currently labs are meeting on the third Monday of every month from 2:30-3:30pm. 

This meeting will be held over Zoom. You can RSVP for CLIP with this link

The TimeBank Community Helpline

  • Posted on: 1 January 2020
  • By: Dane County TimeBank

The Timebank Community Helpline

Using the power of restorative justice practices to offer open minded listening, practical support and referrals for COVID-19 resources

 

What does the Helpline do:

  • Continuity for youth currently involved with restorative justice
  • Referrals to much needed COVID-19 resources like rent, mortgage and utilities relief, food, transportation and more
  • One-to-one conversations that allow callers to vent, destress, reconnect.
  • A place to report racist abuses and violence experienced or witnessed in the community, in school or other places.
  • An alternative to calling 911 on Black people when that’s not needed.

MediaWatch

  • Posted on: 1 January 2020
  • By: Dane County TimeBank

The objectives of MediaWatch team are to:

1) Respond to the need for independent media that is diversified and at all levels

2) Create opportunities for independent media to collaborate with grassroots communities

3) Encourage people to respond to racism in the media and,

4)Interrupt how info is shared that perpetuates white supremacist culture

End Violence Against Black People Campaign

  • Posted on: 1 January 2020
  • By: Dane County TimeBank

The (Taskforce) Campaign to End Violence Against Black People began as a response to the arrest of black children. In December of 2019 a 14 year-old was arrested at his middle school. Lincoln HiIls is full of Black children. Why is it acceptable for Black children to be locked behind bars? The task force asks, what kinds of institutional violence is taking place in our schools and other institutions that normalize this kind of violence? 

This is a collaboration between the TimeBank Transformative Action Network and Freedom Inc. The goal of this Taskforce is to create greater visibility of this problem and decriminalize Black youth. The focus is on broadening the conversation about this violence and compelling white allies to address the role of hypersegregation as a form of structural violence that bolsters and normalizes violence against Black children. The reason for this letter writing campaign is to lay pressure on the system, to break silence, make the violence visible, and do everything we can to stop this violence. We must all be responsible for ending violence against our Black neighbors.

Our goal is to send 2000 letters by November 3, 2020.

Coordinating Committee

  • Posted on: 1 January 2020
  • By: Dane County TimeBank

The TAN Coordinating committee is modeled after the SNCC in the sense that it seeks to engage in participatory democracy and build alliances on the basis of co-conspirator, abolitionist and racial justice principles. This work is guided by the writing of Bettina Love and Ella Baker. The purpose of thie committee is to coordinate the work of the Transformative Action Network. 

The current members of the TAN Coordinating Team are: 

  • Damita Brown, Director of the TimeBank Restorative Justice Program
  • Gretchen Trast
  • Marin Smith
  • Ryan Eykholt
  • Shayne Gerberding  

Vision

  • Posted on: 1 January 2020
  • By: Dane County TimeBank

Getting involved with TAN means first taking an orientation that explores diaspora identity and racial disparities. The diaspora activity gives participants an opportunity to examine elements of entitlement and dispossession connected to identity, history, and perceptions of belonging. At the core of this introduction to diaspora identity is the question: ‘how does one’s personal investment in narratives of domination perpetuate white supremacist culture?’ In any given moment, we have a choice about which narrative we’re going to subscribe to. That choice is enacted in our every day actions. By examining our own cultural identities, we create the possibility of dismantling hierarchies grounded in privilege, racism, and ignorance.

 

Approaching racial disparities from the perspective that we all inherited the social conditions and inequities that we’re experiencing provides further opportunity to change the way we act. We can transform the cultural practices that we have inherited. Transformative Action Network takes this as its first priority. Within this context, ‘action’ is not grounded in guilt or shame or blame. Rather, it emerges from a self-awareness and conviction about personal power to make change. We engage in this work through Community Lab for Intentional Practice (CLIP) and other opportunities to build collaborations and to seek out co-conspirator alliances that end racial disparities. 

 

Our CLIP labs are loosely guided by the work of Dr. Bettina Love and her book ‘We Want to Do More Than Survive: Abolitionist Teaching and the Pursuit of Educational Freedom’. The abolitionist approach is valuable because it is committed to the idea of replacing institutional harm. The educational survival complex is something that is replicated in all of our institutions. We use that premise in building collaborations with other organizations and groups that seek to do similar abolitionist and anti-racist work in other institutions.

 

Orientation

  • Posted on: 1 January 2020
  • By: Ryan Eykholt

Getting involved with TAN means first taking an orientation that explores diaspora identity and racial disparities. The diaspora activity gives participants an opportunity to examine elements of entitlement and dispossession connected to identity, history, and perceptions of belonging. At the core of this introduction to diaspora identity is the question: ‘how does one’s personal investment in narratives of domination perpetuate white supremacist culture?’ In any given moment, we have a choice about which narrative we’re going to subscribe to. That choice is enacted in our every day actions. By examining our own cultural identities, we create the possibility of dismantling hierarchies grounded in privilege, racism, and ignorance.

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